Arduino Game Boy Printer Emulator

Brian Khuu (mofosyne) created an Arduino powered Game Boy Printer emulator; after picking up a couple of Game Boy Camera’s and finding a bunch of images on them he attempted to dump the images, and succeeded! Being a massive fan of both the Game boy and photography this project was for me. A while back I picked up a handful of super cheap (good quality but inexpensive with the CH340G chip) Arduino’s. It was hard trying to find projects that I really really wanted to do.

Luckily while browsing Hackaday I seen this article about the project. I quickly went to the good ol’ eBay to pick up a GBC Link Cable (from hellfire_trading) and had a rummage through my Arduino box. Decided on the Micro, it seemed perfect for the job. I had a Raspberry Pi GPIO breakout board which fit the Arduino Micro quite well.

Gameboy Original/Color Link Cable Pinout
 __________
|  6  4  2 |
 \_5__3__1_/ (at cable)
 
Arduino Pin      Gameboy Link Pin
unused           Pin 1 : 5.0V
D4               Pin 2 : Serial OUTPUT
D3               Pin 3 : Serial INPUT
unused           Pin 4 : Serial Data
D2               Pin 5 : Serial Clock (Interrupt)
GND              Pin 6 : GND (Attach to GND Pin)

 

Once you’ve got it all soldered you can upload your code to your Arduino. Plug it into your Game Boy, open up your Arduino’s IDE Serial Monitor (Ctr+Shift+M) and set the baud rate to 115200. Go to your image on your GB Camera and press Print. You’ll see a bunch of code coming through the monitor. Copy all of the code and open the gameboy_printer_js_decoder.html and paste in the code and press Click to Update Gameboy Tile.

 

Here’s an instructional video of the process.

A post shared by West McGowan (@imwestm) on

If you’re getting any errors feel free to contact either myself or Brian. We’d both love to see your pictures too!

 

Extra

EUR Game Boy Camera Frames

Pictures Taken By Me

 

Cheap Arduino Serial Driver

If you’re struggling to get a cheap Arduino clone to upload code using your IDE; the chances are that it’s not connecting via the COM port correctly. This maybe caused because your board uses a CH340G serial to usb chip, which Windows doesn’t recognise. Download the driver below or from the manufacturers website (in Chinese). Failing that, you could have bought a board without a bootloader. I’ll write a tutorial as soon as I get a board without one pre-installed.

Download “CH340G / CH341G Serial Driver - CH341SER.exe” CH341SER.EXE – Downloaded 146 times – 238 KB

Download “CH340 Datasheet” CH341DS1.pdf – Downloaded 160 times – 144 KB

 

 

PC Button Box

I picked up an Arduino from work and attempted to create a Button Box, and it bloody worked! I found the wiring diagram and code from Kevin Peat’s site. This is a very picture heavy post!

Drill.jpg
Bought a box, made a layout and got to work with a drill.

Planning.jpg
The bracket inside was for attaching it to my wheel stand. It came from an Ikea bookcase, its the bracket for attaching it to the wall. #Recycling =P

Buttons.jpg
It’s a bit wonky, but it’ll do!

IDE.jpg
I started the soldering part by removing every other wire from an IDE cable, so it would leave me only the wires on the same row.

IDE%20Arduino.jpg
I trimmed the wires I didn’t need. Using an IDE cable gave me something I could hot glue onto inside of the case so I can easily remove the Arduino if it didn’t work/I needed it for another project.

Wiring.jpg
There’s two quarter inch jack sockets on the back for foot pedals, or when I have the time and resources a rally style gear stick =D

Attached.jpg
And finally! The moment you’ve been waiting for (possibly).

Attached2.jpg
I intend to make a fancier looking one someday, but this was super cheap to make!